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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

How Learning Works - 7 Research-Based Principles For Smart Teaching

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Description
Writing this book was a signifi cant undertaking, which we would not have been able to complete without the help of many friends and colleagues. Although many faculty colleagues across disciplines and institutions have found these principles helpful and encouraged us to publish them, it was Rich Mayer who, after seeing a presentation of our learning principles, convinced us to share them with the larger education community. Little did he know that his encouragement would lead to more
work for him! We are thrilled and grateful to Rich for writing the Foreword to this book.


Content:-
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Foreword
Richard E. Mayer
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Introduction Bridging Learning Research and Teaching Practice
1 How Does Students’ Prior Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
2 How Does the Way Students Organize Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
3 What Factors Motivate Students to Learn?
4 How Do Students Develop Mastery?
5 What Kinds of Practice and Feedback Enhance Learning?
6 Why Do Student Development and Course Climate Matter for Student Learning?
7 How Do Students Become Self-Directed Learners?
Conclusion Applying the Seven Principles to Ourselves
Appendices
Appendix A: What Is Student Self-Assessment and How Can We Use It?
Appendix B: What Are Concept Maps and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix C: What Are Rubrics and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix D: What Are Learning Objectives and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix E: What Are Ground Rules and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix F: What Are Exam Wrappers and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix G: What Are Checklists and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix H: What Is Reader Response/Peer Review and How Can We Use It?
References
Name Index
Subject Index



Author Details
Susan A. Ambrose is associate provost for education, director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, and teaching professor in the Department of History at Carnegie Mellon. She received her doctorate in American history from Carnegie Mellon in 1986 and has been at the Eberly Center since its inception

Michael W. Bridges is the director of faculty development at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) St. Margaret Hospital, where he works with family practice residents and fellows. He received his doctorate in social psychology from Carnegie Mellon in 1997.

Michele DiPietro is associate director for graduate programs at the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and instructor in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon. He received his doctorate in statistics from Carnegie Mellon in 2001 and has been at the Eberly Center since 1998.

Marsha C. Lovett is associate director for faculty development at the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and associate teaching professor in the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon. The question that drives her work is how people learn. She has studied this question from various perspectives, as a graduate student, postdoctoral researcher, and assistant professor in Carnegie Mellon ’ s Psychology Department. 

Marie K. Norman is a teaching consultant and research associate at the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, and adjunct professor of anthropology in the history department at Carnegie Mellon. She received her doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh ’ s Department of Anthropology in 1999, where her research, funded by a Fulbright doctoral studies grant, focused on the effects of tourism on caste relations in Nepal.


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